How to Perform a Cyber Security Risk Assessment in Five Steps

How safe is your organization from cyberthreats? The best way to answer that question is by performing a thorough cyber security risk assessment. A cyber security risk assessment—the process of identifying, analyzing and evaluating risk­s—is the only way to know which cybersecurity controls you need, and how to prioritize them. Without such an assessment you could waste time, money and resources on events which might have minimal impact, and be ill-prepared for events that might have significant ones.

These Are the Steps You Need to Perform Your Own Cyber Security Risk Assessment:

  1. Review Your Resources

Before you can assess risk, you should review all the resources you need to protect.  Don’t just audit the resources you think might be at risk. Assess everything that connects to your network. Hackers will.

For example, did you know smart watches can be hacked to steal ATM PIN numbers and passwords, merely based on your hand movements? Or that someone can take control of a presenter’s screen and screen controls by hacking into video conferencing technology? In your cyber security review include IoT devices, unused desktops, and everything you use on a daily basis including telephones (landline and smart phones), applications and routers. A cybersecurity risk assessment will identify not only hardware but customer data and software.

  1. Identify Threats

Threat identification should include anything that can damage your infrastructure, cost you money from lost revenue, threaten intellectual secrets or infringe customer (or employee, or student or family) privacy. While a professional will be able to identify those threats more thoroughly than you can yourself, you can still perform a cursory review of them. For example, malware and viruses are obvious network risks.

The hardest part, and why a professional cyber security risk assessment is important, is identifying those lesser known risks, such as from your printer or voice mail. A professional will check to see if firmware updates have been made, as well as the status of your firewall and antivirus software.

Don’t forget to consider threat assessment from an internal standpoint as well. As

Jorge Rey, chief information security officer for accounting firm Kaufman Rossin recently said, “I think small businesses [are] worried about threats that [aren’t] even affecting them. They’re all freaking out about hackers, but they’re not even looking at their own employees and their access to systems and … data.”

  1. Rate Risks

Not every risk listed in your cyber security risk assessment is a high priority, and determining the risks, and impact of those risks, will help you determine where to focus your security attention and dollars. You should rate each risk on a scale of low to high. This will help you prioritize your initial and longer term efforts. For example, you could rate your risks according to this scale:

  • High – Substantial, possible crippling and unrecoverable impact
  • Medium – Damaging, but recoverable or inconvenient
  • Low – Impact is minimal and easily worked around

An example of a high-risk resource would be your perimeter routers. A router with outdated firmware could let hackers run rampant. Conversely, a low risk resource might be data or documents that do not have sensitive information, or that is publicly available.

  1. Analyze Protection

You likely have basic protocols in place, but how much protection do they really provide, and where are you the weakest? Hiring a professional (like Single Path) may be critical in completely understanding how well you are protected from each possible threat. DDoS security, adequate cyber security monitoring services, and employee training are basic proactive protection measures you should be taking (and which we have written about many times before on this site).

  1. Calculate Risk

Calculating risk will also help you determine what areas to prioritize, and what threats need immediate financial support in order to implement. Two questions to ask are: What is the chance of each incident occurring, and what amount of risk, if any, am I willing to accept? Your type of organization, such as whether you are a business or school, or a public or private entity, will no doubt greatly influence that decision.

When determining the likelihood of each event, you will need to list every breach point and possible point of origin for an attack, both external and internal. Depending on network complexity, this could involve dozens of breach/source pairings.

Single Path Can Help

Creating a cyber security risk assessment is not an undertaking that can be finished in an afternoon. It takes careful analysis, and quite a bit of experience. After you finish your initial steps, and have a basic grasp of your potential risks and vulnerabilities, you will want an outside expert to fill the gaps and take an unbiased, knowing look. At Single Path, we’re well-versed at doing exactly this. Single Path can help identify trouble spots, give advice on how to prevent problems, and also provide guidance if problems do happen. Our impressive menu of security solutions will go a long way to protect your valuable assets, and your organization from risk. A cyber security risk assessment is a critical step in protecting your organization. Ask us how to get started.

What You Don’t Know Can Hurt You: The Perils of Inadequate Cyber Security Asset Management.

cyber security asset managementWe’re often surprised at how frequently companies fail to adequately track their IT resources. But while tracking the life cycle of your IT devices is important to assure you maximize their value, it is also a critical safety issue. BYOD devices, mobile devices and third party cloud service providers only enhance the need for effective cyber security asset management.

A Wake Up Call

A recent, much read and passed around blog post from cybersecurity expert Daniel Miessler detailed many of the issues regarding lax cyber security asset management. Miessler wrote: “Asset management is arguably the most important component of a security program, but I know of virtually zero companies that have a single person dedicated to it.” He goes on to point out that, “Companies pay hundreds of thousands a year to keep snacks in the break rooms. They pay to send people to training and conferences that usually have very few tangible benefits … But pay 100K a year to have a list of what we’re actually defending? Nope.”

The Life Cycle of IT Assets

An IT asset life cycle refers to the stages that an information technology asset goes through during its time of ownership. Determining the current life cycle stage for each IT asset is a necessity for effective cyber security asset management and may look like this:

  1. Procurement. It should be a matter of course that, whenever an asset is purchased, it is recorded in your organization’s asset management system, and your IT devices and software should be no exception. Information should include model numbers, serial numbers, name of manufacturer and the department the equipment was purchased for.
  2. Distribution of assets. Recording to whom the assets are distributed, or redistributed, is the next necessary step to take for cyber security asset management. Many organizations lose track of who has what devices, and this can only get more muddled as employees leave, shift departments and so on. You’ll also want to tightly control what devices run which software assets; employees who have access to programs they won’t use or don’t need may only needlessly impair security.
  3. Maintenance and Upgrade. Software and hardware updates often have security patches (see our earlier post about the importance of patching). Each update or patch should be recorded, and verified. An organization should also record the last time a device was scanned or antivirus software run, or antivirus schedules.

Be thorough. In 2014, JP Morgan Chase overlooked one of their network servers when providing a security update. Hackers were able use this exposed server to steal data from roughly 83 million customers.

Maintaining devices also means making sure employees aren’t uploading or using unauthorized or unmanaged software. This software may be benign, or it could be an entry point for a hacker to invade

  1. A list of log-in users for each device. Even if a device is assigned to one specific employee, a device may be shared or passed around. Keeping a list of every user for each device can help protect them, especially when a staff member leaves, as a reminder their log in should be deleted.
  2. Disposal/Retirement. When a piece of equipment has run its course, don’t forget to verify that all the information on it has been wiped clean, so that company data is not vulnerable to hackers. You also may want to cancel or transfer licenses.

Keep in mind that cyber security asset management cannot be a one-time only chore; it’s success hinges on its continuity. You have to know when each asset changes hands, becomes outdated, needs updating and so on.

As cybersecurity company Compuquip says, “IT asset management is a lot of work—which may explain why so many companies fall behind on this critical task. But, the importance of asset management for your company’s IT components cannot be overstated.”

Let’s Get Started With Your Cyber Security Asset Management

Our recent blog post on cyber security monitoring stressed the importance of being proactive in keeping your organization safe form cyber threats. Cyber security asset management is a critical component of proactive security, and can be the difference between rebounding quickly after a cyberattack and not recovering at all. Understanding the importance of an active cyber security asset management system is a first and proactive step, but you also need to put that understanding into action. Single Path can help. We offer a wide selection of security offerings including infrastructure patch management, 24/7/365 network monitoring services, proactive desktop and server security and more.

Let us help get your asset management program started. Contact us for more information.

6 Ways to Improve Employee Cyber Security Awareness, for Businesses and Schools

According to Accenture’s Cost of Cyber Crime Study, the average cost of cyber crime in the United States reached $21.22 million per organization last year (compared to $17.26 million the year before). But you can’t depend solely on your IT department for your cyber security. After all, a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Improving cyber safety means increasing employee cyber security awareness throughout your entire business or school.

Here are the 6 top ways you can get your employees on board to increase engagement and improve employee cyber security awareness.

  1. Education

Do your employees or staff know:

  • Working remotely using an unsecure Wi-Fi connection leaves computers vulnerable to attacks?
  • Using personal, unsecured devices for work can open the door to compromising an organization’s network?
  • What employees say and do on social media can be tracked by cybercriminals and used against them in the workplace?

Chances are, some if not all of those points may surprise some people on your team. Most experts agree that the #1 key to cyber security compliance at a business or school is educating staff on the risks. For example, in addition to the above bullet points, does everyone on your team know how to spot a Phishing email (see our earlier blog post, How to Spot a Phishing Email), or the risks of using a thumb drive (see our post, USB Security Risks: When Flash Drives Become Dangerous)? An educated team, with increased employee cyber security awareness, makes for a more secure organization.

  1. Assign Mandatory Training

Recently we came across an article in Forbes Magazine that recommended, “Employees and management from all industries should be assigned mandatory cyber security compliance training every year.” This requirement can be administered with computer-based training modules and tied into annual reviews. When implementing training you’ll want to ensure executive and management support, a way to measure success, and also consider incentivizing participation (for more information, check out our earlier blog post, We’re Only Human: The Importance of Security Awareness Training.)

You may want to work with an outside partner to implement training, such as Single Path. We’re well versed in educating and training staff in the most up-to-date cyber security best practices.

  1. Establish and Promote Simple Procedures

More often than not, employees are happy to follow procedures as long as they are aware of them, and they are easy understand. Create organization-wide procedures for your team to follow. Make sure they are functional, actionable and simple.

Once you have those procedures in place, figure out the best way to communicate them within the organization. Keep communication friendly, and avoid hard-to-understand cyberspeak. Says Ashwin Ramasamy, co-founder of marketing intelligence company PipeCandy, “We use comic book-like imagery and sci-fi and comic language in posters across the office that reinforces the message without being suffocating.” Choose a method of communication that will resonate with your team.

  1. Encourage Reporting of Incidents

The best-trained employees can still fall for a hacking ploy from time to time, such as opening a file or clicking a link without thinking. Even IT professionals fall for these tricks. But if a user feels foolish for falling for an attack, and are embarrassed, he or she is less likely to report it. Create a reporting system that rewards staff for reporting suspicious messages, and that allows them to share mistakes without penalty or stigma.

  1. Have Employees Manage Initiatives

Rather than protocols created only by management, make cyber security policy an employee-managed initiative. Create a committee with representatives from every department, and make it their responsibility to set procedure, communicate policy and enforce compliance. Department participation, where everyone feels included, helps ensure individual buy-in.

  1. Make Awareness a Part of New-Employee Orientation

Employees expect to learn rules and processes when they start a new job, and making cyber security a part of their new-employee orientation stresses its importance, and immediately lays the groundwork for your expectations. An employee handbook is also a great place to publish protocols and procedures.

Your Employee Cyber Security Awareness Partner

To implement an employee cyber security awareness program it helps to have a proven partner. Single Path has helped countless businesses, schools and other organizations create a robust, living program that connects employees and staff to best practices. We can help you create a functional and effective cyber-threat strategy for your school or business. Single Path Security offerings are extensive, collaborative and modern.

Ask us how to get started!

Five Top Cyber Security Threats for 2019

Cyber security concerns have been around for as long as there has been cyber-anything. The first computer virus was found infecting computers in the early 1970’s and the first malware author was convicted in 1988. Those early infections were primitive compared to today’s hacking threats, which continue to grow more complex and sophisticated. While it’s vital to be prepared against any contingency, no matter how remote, we consider these to be the top cyber security threats for 2019.

Cryptojacking Rising

Ransomware has grown by 350% according to a report by Dimension Data, and accounts for 7% of all malware. It has been reported that ransomware costs American businesses north of 75 billion dollars a year, with most attacks never publicly disclosed. The biggest increase in ransomware is expected to take the form of Cryptojacking, also known as “Cryptomining malware.” We discussed the problem of Cryptojacking in a recent blog post, in which we described how hackers can hijack computer processing power to mine cryptocurrency. We expect these cyber security threats for 2019 to continue to grow.

Software Subversion Expanding

As Security magazine reports, “While exploitation of software flaws is a longstanding tactic used in cyber attacks, efforts to actively subvert software development processes are also increasing.” In other words, the software you download may be infected, giving hackers a back channel into an entire network. Malware has even been detected in open source software libraries. Another variant is this: hackers may offer software that is spelled slightly different than a popular application (such as adding an “s” or leaving out a letter), with the only other difference being the inclusion of malware. So be careful what you download, even if it’s from a seemingly trusted source.

Cybercriminals Uniting

One of the top cyber security threats for 2019 is due to the expanding resources available to cybercriminals. Historically, many cybercriminals have worked alone, or in small groups. That’s starting to change. The proliferation of hacker forums and chat groups have launched a robust black market where cybercriminals buy and exchange malware, botnets and other criminal resources. The availability of these rogue offerings means that even inexperienced, or less able, hackers can launch sophisticated attacks. These “malware-as-a-service” opportunities will only continue to grow, which will result in an increased number of cyberattacks, especially in regards to identity and credit card theft. If you think the threats are numerous now–and they are–an aggressive and nearly overwhelming wave of attacks may be on the horizon.

Synergistic Threats Increasing

GandCrab has been in the news frequently. Discovered in January, GandCrab is a ransomware Trojan horse, encrypting files on a computer and then demanding payment to decrypt them. Just recently, the group behind GandCrab has targeted users visiting adult websites, asking for money to keep silent about their potentially embarrassing visits. This, however, is just a ruse to mask their real intent. When a user clicks on the email link, he or she inadvertently installs the GandCrab ransomware onto his or her computer.

GandCrab has grown to be so large, they are actually soliciting cybercriminals to partner with them. As McAfee reported, “At the end of September, the GandCrab crew started a ‘crypt competition’ on a popular underground forum to find a new crypter service they could partner with.” This will let the GandCrab organization expand its criminal activities in new, unforeseen, ways.

In 2019, many experts, including Security magazine, predicts attackers will continue to combine tactics to create multi-faced, or synergistic, threats. To combat them, organizations will also need to synergize their defenses.

Social Media Misinformation Mounting

The proliferation of Russian-originated Facebook pages influencing the 2016 U.S. presidential elections has been well documented by news sources across the world. So it shouldn’t be a surprise that cybercriminals are eyeing social media as offering rich opportunities for criminal enterprise, with posts and pages displaying an impressive degree of professional-looking design for dishonest purposes. Botnet operators are able to test messaging just like a marketer, including the use of hashtags, to determine the success rates of their misinformation.

Social media platforms are aware of the potential abuse, and are focusing their resources on stopping it, but with so many users, and so much data available on sites, criminals will further focus their resources on these big-scale platforms.

Protect your business from the Cyber Security Threats for 2019

These five cyber security threats for 2019 are just the tip of the iceberg. There are many more threats out there, many of which we may not even be able to imagine yet. The only thing an organization can do is to be prepared with smart, sophisticated technological resources and by adhering to best Internet safety practices. Consider Single Path your partner in anti-crime. Single Path Security Offerings run the gamut from employee training to insider threat solutions. We’ll help you be prepared for the cyber security threats for 2019 and also those still to come.

Ask us how to get started!

Six Steps to Creating an Effective Business Continuity Plan

You take all the recommended cybersecurity precautions. You back up. Your staff is trained on processes. You have firewalls in place, passwords that are hard to decipher, and the most recent security patches in place. Yet, you still worry. You’re not alone. According to a recent survey, businesses ranked cyberattacks as their #1 threat, with data breach a close second. But if you are victimized by a cybersecurity incident, what do you do now? If you have a business continuity plan in place, the answer to that question is easy: follow the business continuity plan.

A business continuity plan is not the same as a disaster recovery plan, although they have a lot of similarities. As CIO magazine explains, a BC plan is about “maintaining business functions or quickly resuming them in the event of a major disruption,” while DR “focuses mainly on restoring an IT infrastructure and operations after a crisis.” In other words, DR is specific to IT, while a business continuity plan is concerned with the continuity of the entire organization (we discussed the six things you needed to include in your disaster recovery plan in an earlier article).

When you create your business continuity plan, make sure you take into account these six criteria:

  1. Conduct a business impact analysis

As Ready.gov reports, your business continuity plan should start with a complete analysis of the consequences of a business disruption and can include:

  • Lost sales and income, or delayed sales or income
  • Increased expenses (e.g., overtime labor, outsourcing, expediting costs, etc.)
  • Regulatory fines
  • Contractual penalties or loss of contractual bonuses
  • Customer dissatisfaction or defection
  • Delay of new business plans

Your Business Impact Analysis should also detail various risk scenarios and prioritize the order of events for restoration.

  1. Get everyone involved

If you are making the assumption that IT security is solely the responsibility of the IT department, think again. Your entire organization should be working together to protect its data and systems. Consider holding a brief workshop on IT security, create a business continuity management committee with members within and outside the IT department, and consider the impact and recovery on each member of your staff.

One crucial area of involvement is with your leadership team. As reported by Disaster Recovery Journal, it’s important for executives to support a culture of collaboration and to be transparent. “If executives support a culture of transparency, people will be more willing to reveal and troubleshoot problem areas in your organization’s processes. Down the road, this could help the organization mitigate a major vulnerability.”

  1. Establish work-arounds

Ready.gov paints this scenario: “Telephones are ringing and customer service staff is busy talking with customers and keying orders into the computer system. The electronic order entry system checks available inventory, processes payments and routes orders to the distribution center for fulfillment. Suddenly the order entry system goes down. What should the customer service staff do now?”

Developing manual workarounds eliminates uncertainty. For example, listing contact personnel (along with phone numbers and contact information) and providing specific details, such as how to document transactions manually, gives your team direction. You may need to reassign staff or even bring in temporary assistance if systems fail. How will you do that? Plan it all out now in your business continuity plan.

  1. Keep data on the cloud

The best way to ensure your business can continue to run, is by backing up all your data on the cloud. A cloud service ensures that an organization’s critical data and processes are secure off-site. An organization can then quickly ramp up their systems in the case of a disaster. If you’re not already on the cloud, check out our earlier posts, 12 Reasons to Move Your Business to the Cloud and 9 Facts to Know About the Risks of Moving to the Cloud, and How to Manage Them.

  1. Ready crisis communication efforts

How prepared is your organization to quickly and effectively respond to and communicate with the public—and each other–during or after a cybersecurity incident? If you are hit by a breach, you may need to issue statements to the press, customers, partners, vendors and staff. We recently posted an article about emergency communication preparedness, in which we stressed the importance of drafting some templates that cover various scenarios. As we wrote: “it’s faster and easier to tweak a message than to write one from scratch for a multitude of mediums, and even multiple languages, if needed.”

  1. Test your business continuity plan

The time to ensure your business continuity plan is effective is before you need it. Is it comprehensive? Are there gaps? For example, are contact phone numbers correct? Are you able to restore data from the cloud without significant barriers or challenges? Since the network may be down, are there hard copies of the business continuity plan, and are they distributed to all the members of the team?

As suggested by CIO magazine, testing options for your business continuity plan include a table-top exercise in a conference room with the team looking for gaps, a structured walk-through or “fire-drill,” often with a specific disaster in mind, and disaster simulation testing in which an actual disaster is simulated involving all the equipment, supplies and personnel (including business partners and vendors) that would be needed.

  1. Call Single Path

While all the steps above are important there’s a seventh step that may be just as vital: call an outside partner like Single Path. As experts in cloud services, IT security solutions and more, Single Path works with businesses, schools and other organizations to protect them from cyberattacks and help them recover when they’re hit. Planning, monitoring and adhering best practices go a long way to protecting your customers or clients, team members, vendors and your own business. Calling a partner like Single Path, and getting your business continuity plan published, are important first steps.

Ask us how to get started!

How to Spot a Phishing Email

Business organizations and schools are under cyber attack. Just this past week, it was reported that the FBI uncovered a phishing email scam aimed at stealing funds from New Jersey state employee online payroll accounts. The emails requested employee login credentials, which the criminals could then use to redirect an employees’ direct deposits. A similar ploy was recently directed at school employees in Atlanta, and the FBI Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) has issued a public warning about phishing email payroll fraud.

The Telltale Sign of a Phishing Email

A simple request to confirm login data, such as in the recent New Jersey state employee scam, may seem legit at first glance. Often these emails may seem to come from the organization itself, a vendor or software provider, or another trusted source. Some of these phishing email schemes are amateurish, but others are more sophisticated and harder to detect. Here are some signs an email may not be on the up-and-up:

  • Subject lines that seem “too good to be true.” They probably are.
  • Subject lines that make threatening statements. Common phishing subjects are “Your account is about to close,” or “Final Warning.”
  • Non-personalized, generic introductions. Look for terms like “Hello Valued User” or “Attention Client.”
  • “From” addresses that may be misspelled or misconfigured. For example, the email may come from someone @ “company-corporation” or “cmopanycorporation” instead of “companycorporation.”
  • Direct links. Always go directly to the source rather than clicking on an email link, or hover over the link to check the actual long-form URL, and not the shortened version displayed in the email text. You may be surprised to see where the link is actually pointing.
  • If you’re not sure, follow your gut. A phone call or personal email confirmation to a colleague or vendor may not only confirm if an email request is on the up-and-up, but alert someone their email might be hacked.
  • And in all cases, never open unexpected attachments, which could have viruses or malware attached.

The FBI also suggests, in response to the New Jersey phishing email scheme, these additional precautions:

  • Employees should forward suspicious requests for personal information to the information technology or human resources department of their organization.
  • Ensure that login credentials used for payroll purposes differ from those used for other purposes, such as employee surveys.

Happy NCSAM

This month (October) is the fifteenth annual National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, an annual initiative to raise awareness about the importance of cybersecurity.

There is plenty of information you can find in support of NCSAM, but one report we found particularly helpful was the Cybersecurity Awareness Toolkit for Small and Medium-Sized Business, as published by the Cyber Security Alliance, Facebook and MediaPro. This toolkit includes a great deal of information on how to identify phishing email tactics.

The toolkit also splits organizational emails into three general buckets, with warnings on why these groups may be targets:

General Population Phishing. The best way into an organization’s network is through its employees, especially when their level of alertness to cyber crimes may be uneven.

HR Manager. HR professionals must be particularly wary when it comes to phishing emails seeking personal information, as they are often the keepers of employee tax and health documents.

Executive Phishing. As privileged users, many executives have greater access to an organization’s network, making them particularly attractive phishing targets.

Whether someone is on the top rung or still climbing the company ladder, their awareness of phishing email techniques can make a big difference in the security of an organization.

Phishing, Solved

We recently wrote a two-part blog post on phishing, and the most common techniques hackers are using to steal your information (check out our phishing blog post part 1 and phishing blog post part 2). Among those techniques we described were phishing email schemes, just like those in New Jersey and Atlanta.

No matter what phishing technique is used, everyone always thinks, “It won’t happen to me,” or, “I’m too smart to fall for that.” But even the best of us can make a mistake. So, what do you do when you mess up, or someone at your business or school organization does?

Contact Single Path. At Single Path, we are experts on beefing up your online security to protect your organization from malicious schemes including employee training of best practices, proactive desktop, server and network infrastructure patch management, and the installation of backup protection. We are also experts at helping you rebound from an attack or natural disaster. With Single Path Security offerings you have access to a wide range of collaborative and customized protective services. Let us help you avoid being victimized. After all, falling prey to a phishing email scheme is a mistake, but doing nothing to prevent it from happening may be an even bigger one.

Ask us how to get started!

School IT Safety: Five Tips for Smarter Physical Security

At Single Path, we spend a lot of time thinking, acting and working on ways to protect computers electronically—backing up data in case of system failure, keeping private information away from hackers, ensuring safe and trouble-free 1:1 learning environments and more. But we know that keeping schools safe also must include physical security, and technology can play a vital role in maintaining it. Physical security includes the use of on-premise safeguards to monitor and protect the facility from theft, intruders, sabotage and even stopping vandalism.

The mere presence of physical safeguards will strongly discourage malicious acts and provide peace of mind for those in the school. But how can you build a secure and safe school environment? Following these five steps is a start, and will go a long way to keeping your school safer.

1. Build a Culture of Security

An organization’s employees are its first line of defense. Train your staff on security awareness, such as locking and encrypting their systems, choosing safe passwords and only sharing confidential information with those who need to know. Making security top-of-mind and habitual is an important component to overall school security.

2. Teach Safety

It takes a village to ensure safety: go beyond your staff to educate everyone. Computers are great resources for children in both learning and social interaction, but schools should also educate them on how to protect their information online and offline, especially in school environments where personal devices may be used. Mark Hickman, COO of global data security company WinMagic said—as quoted in an article from School Planning and Management Magazine—“Teaching about Internet safety and data security is fundamental in providing the tools and knowledge required for youth to understand their role in protecting their valuable personal information.”

3. Secure Rapid Communications

We recently wrote a post, How to Create Your School Cyber-Threat Strategy in which we detailed one of the most important physical security measures you can take—installing or incorporating a robust and simple communication system. The ability to send timely alerts, warnings and information is vital in times of imminent threat such as from a natural disaster or intruder.

4. Assign a Security Manager

An in-depth guideline from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) highlights the need for a security manager to lead security efforts. That manager can be a current staff member or a new hire. According to NCES, the Security Manager should have four main responsibilities:

  1. Increase staff awareness of security issues.
  2. Provide for appropriate staff security training.
  3. Monitor user activity to assess security implementation.
  4. Educate the staff and leadership on the importance of security for both the individual and the organization.

5. Be Smart

One of the keys to staying safe is simply being smart and avoiding common mistakes. The folks at biometric software and security service provider Bayometric detailed some common security mistakes. This list is relevant to all organizations, including schools and school districts, and includes:

  • Not keeping and following documented standard operating procedures for security
  • Poor employee awareness about security, not conducting any training or workshop
  • Not taking security breaches or crimes seriously within the organization
  • Cutting budget to security measures to save money
  • Not aware of the security breaches or crimes happening in neighborhood
  • Not listening to safety concerns of employees
  • Poor disposal practices of sensitive documents
  • Unattended security measures or poorly maintained security equipment

Find a Partner

We titled this post “Five Tips” but really, we probably should have made it six—as this final tip is just as important. Find a partner to help. We know you and the staff at your school or organization are busy. We know how easy it is to put things off for later. That’s where we come in. At Single Path, we have worked with businesses, government organizations and schools to provide complete IT and Security Solutions. We can review your current security protocols and make recommendations for improvement, train staff, find, buy and install optimal technology solutions and so much more. Waiting can be a mistake; you never know when security is needed, and tomorrow may be too late. We can help keep your school safe, including staff and students, by providing you with smart security choices now.

Ask us how to get started!

 

The Value of an Emergency Alert System

Emergencies happen, and when they do, the ability to immediately communicate with your team and emergency responders can be critically important. A natural disaster. A weather alert. A gas leak. Or, something darker. Regardless of the problem, having a communication system in place can make the difference between keeping people safe or leaving them in peril, and keeping your data and equipment safe, too.

We recently worked with a major league baseball team and built a reliable emergency alert system for them. With tens of thousands of fans at their games, plus dozens of employees and players, a lack of communication during an emergency could have had severe consequences. Whether your organization has a thousand students spread out over a campus, hundreds of employees on multiple floors, or a dozen coworkers in relatively tight confines, communication could be the key to not only their safety, but your organization’s recovery.

In Case of Emergency

Benefits of an automated Emergency Alert System include:

  • Keeping staff and students safe from large-scale threats (major weather patterns, pandemics, terrorist activity and more)
  • Reducing the spread of misinformation
  • Communicating protocols: Automated alerts can specify exactly what to do in the time of crisis
  • Faster response times: Quicker alerts can save lives, and minimize business disruption
  • Web-based system: Alerts can be sent from anywhere
  • Regulatory compliance: Many organizations have different requirements for emergency mass notifications
  • Acknowledgment receipts: So organizations can be confident recipients understand the threat and know what to do

One System, Many Alerts

We’ve recently started working with Cistera to offer their instant communication system, and we feel acquiring this system, or one like it, should be carefully considered by your organization. Cistera already works with organizations around the globe to help keep customers, employees and students safe. Their supply call recording and emergency alert software provides a number of distinct options and benefits for many different kinds of organizations.

For schools, Cistera is particularly advantageous. Their AlertIT bell schedule, notification broadcast and emergency alert software is an integrated application that lets school administrators provide alerts such as emergency closure or other automated announcements to teachers, parents and students. These alerts can be sent via a customized, set schedule or manually, as needed, in seconds. Alerts can also go out to first responders, such as by making automated 911 calls and communicating with campus security and public safety departments during a crisis to unify action plans.

The Cistera AlertIT system lets you:

  • Lock down your school from a mobile or desk phone
  • Connect with security and first responders in an emergency
  • Deliver on-campus and parent announcements and alerts

We’re your partner in safety

A comprehensive eBook published by nonprofit research organization RAND Corporation titled The Role of Technology in Improving K-12 School Safety lists a number of best practices including the importance of ensuring existing systems work with new technologies, creating a comprehensive hazard plan, and examining possible threats. We can help. At Single Path, we work with school systems, organizations and businesses of all kinds to ensure top safety solutions are in place. Whether we’re helping determine the best options to solve a problem, training staff, enhancing an existing system or starting a new one from scratch, our Security Solutions can help any organization stay safe.

Ask us how to get started!