Have I Been Hacked? 6 Ways to Tell If You’ve Been Hacked.

Many of us are constantly worrying: why did I click that link? Why did I go to that site? Why did I respond to that email? While there are many things we can do to keep ourselves and our organizations from being hacked, everyone makes a mistake every now and again. But being aware of the telltale signs you’ve been hacked can change the up-all-night question from, “Have I Been Hacked?” to “What Should I Do Now?” And asking that question can make all the difference.

  1. My Gadget is Too Slow!

Your computer is working fine, zipping along, and then … you wait. And wait. Your software gets sluggish, or constantly freezes or crashes. The commands you type take a few extra moments to respond, and your apps take forever to open. If you start noticing some of these symptoms, your gadget may be infected with viruses, trojans or worms. “Have I been hacked?” Quite possibly. Malicious software usually runs in the background, eating up your gadget’s resources while it’s active, often slowing down your system to a crawl.

  1. Why Am I Getting So Many Pop-up Ads?

Did you know malware can add bookmarks to your web browser, website shortcuts to your home screen, and modify the pop-up ads that you get while browsing? And when you click on that pop-up you could download another virus or be taken to a corrupt website selling bogus products or services to get your credit card information. “Have I been hacked?” If you start noticing browser pop-up ads from websites that don’t normally generate them, then the answer is probably, “yes.”

  1. I Got a Ransom Message!

Ransomware is malware that makes your data inaccessible unless you pay a ransom, often in online currency. “Have I been hacked?” If you get a ransomware demand, it could be fake, but there’s also a significant chance your data is gone unless you pay up. If you have a good, recent backup, you can simply recover the data without paying the ransom. If you haven’t backed up your data, you are at the mercy of the hackers holding your ransom. They might send you an encryption code to unlock your data if you pay the ransom. Then again, maybe they won’t.

  1. My Online Password Doesn’t Work!

You’ve typed your password five times. It’s the same password you always use. You’re getting annoyed it’s not working, and so you ask yourself, “Have I been hacked?” Someone might have logged in to your account and changed the password. But how? Per a current article by CSO online, this is most likely to happen after you’ve responded to a phishing email that looked legit, but wasn’t. You get an email you think is from a coworker or a vendor, and you share personal information, and next thing you know a site, with your credit card information conveniently stored, is in someone else’s hands. This is also why using the same passwords on multiple sites is a bad idea. Contacting one website to report fraudulent use is a challenge;  trying to remember all the dozens of sites with your password may be impossible.

  1. I Got An Antivirus Message!

This scam was a bit more prominent a few years ago, but it still comes up every now and again. Typically, you will get an antivirus warning after your computer has been infected. Get protection now! Your system may be compromised! Danger, Will Robinson! “Have I been hacked?” You bet. Clicking on the link takes you to a professional-looking website where they ask for your credit card number and billing information. The hacker now has control of your system and your credit card. It’s win-win for them (and lose-lose for you).

  1. “Where Did This Program Come From?”

Sometimes malicious programs are disguised as legitimate software. But if you don’t recognize the program it may be malicious. Unwanted software is sometimes installed at the same time you install another program; free programs you download from the web are often to blame. “Have I been hacked?” It’s a strong possibility. Always read your license agreements–some free programs actually admit they will be installing spyware or malware onto your computer to avoid legal action against them. They assume you’ll never read the agreement. Most people don’t.

“Have I Been Hacked?” If the Answer is Yes, Here’s What You Need to Do Now

If you have been hacked, you’re not alone. Research company Vanson Bourn found that 44% of organizations they surveyed had suffered multiple hacks in the last year, with an average loss of more than $1 million per company. Have I been hacked?” If so, you need to act quickly and:

  • Change all your passwords. Do this from another machine, as hackers can capture your keystrokes (commonly called keystroke logging). Don’t repeat any password on more than one page.
  • Use a password manager. Coming up with memorable and hard-to-uncover password for every site is nearly impossible. A password manager will create secure passwords and store them for you.
  • Enable two-factor authentication. If you’re not already doing this, use two-factor authentication for all your passwords. A hacker will need both your password and access to a physical device, like your phone, to access a site.
  • Report fraud. Always report fraud right away. Contact your bank and put a freeze on all your vulnerable credit cards immediately.
  • Update your antivirus software. While not 100% effective, these do work. Use a well-known provider. Some antivirus software is created by hackers, and the software will infect your machine, not protect it.
  • Check for new accounts. Open your Inbox, Spam, Trash, and Sent email folders to see if your email was used to set up new accounts—such as emails with subject lines that say, “Your account was successfully created.”
  • Reinstall your operating system and back up files. Reinstall your operating system, wipe your hard drive clean, and retrieve your backup files.

Or, call Single Path

Ideally, before you say,Have I been hacked?” you’ll take action to avoid that problem, such as calling Single Path. We can help restore your system after a hack, or even better, help prevent one from happening. Our Security Offerings give you a line of defense that leave hackers frustrated and seeking easier prey. And our Managed Cloud Services give you access to leading technology with the most recent security patches, without the need for ongoing investments. So, instead of asking “Have I been hacked?” you’ll be saying, “I’m glad I called Single Path.”

Ask us how to get started! 

The Benefits of Proactive Cyber Security Monitoring

cyber security monitoring A business team can take a wait-and-see reactive approach to cyber security, delaying action until it is a victim. Or, it can play a proactive role in anticipating the risks, finding the weaknesses, and putting the processes in place that may prevent or soften a cyber crime from even happening. Cyber security monitoring is one such proactive move that can pay back an initial investment many times over.

Cyber security monitoring involves the collecting and analyzing of information to detect suspicious or unauthorized behavior or changes on a network, triggering alerts, and often taking automatic, precautionary actions. Think of it as a high quality security alarm. You can leave your doors unlocked and check every now and then to see if anything has been stolen and, if so, notify the insurance company. That’s reactive. Or, you can set an alarm and not only will you know when a break-in occurs, but the system can notify the police, lock doors, and stop the break-in its tracks.

Now, or never?

Even the most secure system can be broken into, and even the most experienced IT professional can leak a password. But with proactive cyber security monitoring you can find and respond swiftly to these mistakes, and threats. In contrast, a reactive cyber security policy leaves you vulnerable, and recovery can be slow. According to the Ponemon Institute, it takes an average of 191 days for a business to detect a hack. The consequences of being hacked for days, weeks or months before noticing it may be substantial, with data continuously compromised or leaked, used and shared across a broad network of cyber criminals. The immediate and long-term ramifications of such a delay is likely to far eclipse any cyber security monitoring investment. Just a few months ago for example, Marriott International announced their network had been hacked since 2014, and wasn’t discovered until September, 2018. Information from 500 million customers was compromised.

As one security industry company writes, “You need to assume that your business will be breached at some point and have appropriate monitoring controls and procedures in place to mitigate the risks.”

Cyber Security Monitoring Basics

Cyber security monitoring utilizes a variety of mechanisms to continuously keep tabs on network traffic, and then send out alerts or take action at the right moment. As international cyberthreat intelligence provider Blueliv reports, there are typically four stages to the lifecycle of a breach:

  1. Attempting to get the information, like passwords and network credentials (via phishing or other schemes)
  2. Collecting the information (from people falling for the schemes)
  3. Validating the information (to make sure the information works, often though an automated bot)
  4. Monetizing the information (selling it to a third party, using it to steal data, and so on).

With the right threat intelligence, however, an IT security team can step in and stop the lifecycle midstream. With cyber security monitoring, action can be taken while attackers are still attempting to validate the information, or before they’ve finished fully collecting it.

Proactive Help

From hackers to disgruntled employees, to outdated devices to third-party service providers, companies are routinely exposed to security threats, often from unexpected sources. Quick response time is essential, and automated, continuous cyber security monitoring is the key to fast threat detection and response.

At Single Path our proactive monitoring services have saved our clients countless times, not only from outside threats, but from a whole host of unexpected issues. For example, our proactive cyber security monitoring for the Chicago White Sox revealed signs of imminent failure within their Contact Center Server. We were able to apply a patch to the server before it failed, preventing any disruption to customer service. At Single Path, our 24/7 proactive cyber security monitoring and problem-solving are part of what make us an outstanding partner in the continual battle against cyber security breaches or issues, and is just one of our many IT as a Service offerings.

Contact us to find out more.

5 Spooky Network Security Hacks That Can Haunt Your Office

What’s making that icy feeling of dread crawl up your spine? Is it from a Halloween ghost haunting your supply closet? Or the fear that your fax machine has been taken over by evil spirits? Assuming those evil fax spirits are hackers trying to crash your network security, that last guess might not be so far-fetched.

The Threat of IoT to Network Security

With the influx of Internet devices, many of which we wear or use daily, the security issues related to the Internet of Things are growing. Garner analysts predict that more than 25% of all cyberattacks will involve IoT devices by 2020. We detailed IoT in a previous blog post, where we discussed how hackers can infiltrate network security through your HVAC system, Smart Watch and more. Here are five more spookily surprising devices that can be hacked and compromise network security.

  1. Your Fax is Lax

The problem with many electronic devices is that their manufacturers just aren’t paying very close attention to security. Even if you have a newer fax machine or printer, it may still use security protocols established in the 1980’s. More than 45 million fax machines are in operation worldwide, many as part of all-in-one printers. Healthcare organizations in particular use fax machines for the vast majority of their communication.

According to an article from Healthcare IT News, a hacker would only need a fax number to launch a malicious attack. The attacker could then transmit an image with an embedded code that would allow them to take over the fax machine. That might not sound horrible, until you realize “They would then be able to download and deploy other tools to scan the network and compromise devices.” In other words, the Fax machine becomes the portal into a network, and its data.

  1. A Call For Help

Employees use their mobile phones almost as often as their computers, if not more so. It’s easy to forget that these devices often have complete network access and can be used to compromise network security, too. We’ve warned about this before; an earlier blog post on BYO devices for businesses, and another one about BYO devices in schools explain the need to establish an organization-wide BYOD policy, creating cloud back-ups of data and the importance of antivirus and malware protection.

But hackers can also use a non-mobile phone system to access a network. According to workplace technology company Ricoh, hackers can get past some phone system security protocols with little effort, and then can:

  • Eavesdrop on conversations
  • Tap into your VoIP line to make high-volume spam calls to foreign countries
  • Flood your server with data, using up bandwidth and causing your connections to be shut off. This may be followed with a ransomware demand.
  • Infect your system with viruses and malware. Just like office computers, your internet phones are vulnerable to programs that can track keystrokes, steal passwords and destroy information.
  1. Hackers are Eyeing Your Surveillance Cameras

Ironically, the security cameras designed to protect your business, could end up hurting it. And that’s spooky. While it’s convenient to watch security footage off-site, anything you can watch at home, hackers can watch too. Hackers can also take over the cameras to record videos or do their own surveillance of your workspace, sell camera access to other parties interested in doing that, make systems unusable or threaten to sell their use unless a ransom is paid, or even use the cameras to furtively steal credit card numbers from customers. Internet security company Trend Micro reports that one web forum claims, “as many as 2,000 exposed IP cameras are said to be connected to cafes, hospitals, offices, warehouses and other locations.”

  1. Getting a Smart TV may not be so Smart

A haunted television for Halloween?  Sort of. A recent Consumer Reports article (February 7, 2018) details how millions of smart TV’s have security flaws that can be easily hacked. A hacker can change channels, play offensive content or crank up (or down) the volume. While they probably can’t steal anything too valuable, this still can be “deeply unsettling to someone who didn’t understand what was happening.”

  1. A Coffee Jolt

The threat of someone hacking your coffee maker seems very, should we say, eye-opening? A recent article in the online journalistic mag The Conversation discussed how hackers can infiltrate cars, toys, thermostats, medical implants and yes, coffee machines. “A hacker who succeeds in communicating with one of these device can then conduct any number of possible attacks. They could disrupt communications, which would be irritating in the case of a coffee machine, but potentially life threatening in the case of a medical implant.”

Your Partner Against Crime

These hacking examples are just the tip of the iceberg (or perhaps the ice-cold fingertips of a Halloween skeleton). At Single Path, we’re security experts and our Security Offerings cover a vast menu of services. We can perform a desktop security risk assessment, implement a proactive network security plan and ethical hacking/employee training, implement next generation firewalls and establish email/content filtering. The threat of hacking doesn’t have to be Halloween-level frightening—at least not if you call Single Path.

Ask us how to get started!

Is Your Cisco Network Hardware Leaving You Vulnerable?

Recently, Cisco Systems made the news, but not the sort of news any Internet-related business wants to make. Their network hardware was hijacked, and hundreds of thousands of their customers were victims.

As this blog post from Kaspersky Labs reported right when the attack hit: “According to our sources, there’s a massive attack against Cisco switches going on right now—these switches are used in data-centers all across the globe.”

For those on a Cisco network, this was, and continues to be, a frustrating and potentially nightmarish issue. For those who don’t use Cisco networking switches, this event is a reminder that vulnerabilities exist everywhere, and constant vigilance is crucial.

What exactly went wrong?

More than 200,000 Cisco network router switches worldwide were hacked on Friday, April 6, 2018. This affected large Internet service providers and data centers across the world, especially in Iran, Russia, the United States, China, Europe and India. According to an Iranian government official, “Some 55,000 devices were affected in the United States and 14,000 in China.”

As a result of this hack, many users found their Internet connections blocked, websites down, and screens showing an American flag and the note, “We were tired of attacks from government-backed hackers on the United States and other countries.” It seems machines affected in the United States were collateral damage from an attack meant to hit foreign states. Anarchic hactivists are suspected, although no one has been charged.

Mounir Hahad, head of Juniper Threat Labs, a network and security product manufacturer confirmed initial suspicions when he said, “The vulnerability is severe enough to cause a lot of damage and implant a man-in-the-middle agent [a scheme we discussed in a past blog post], but it doesn’t look like the attacker took advantage of it. I suspect this is the work of a hacktivist group with sympathy toward the U.S., which had no intention to inflict serious damage.”

So, good news, we suppose. But it’s only good news compared to what may have been much worse news. A different group could have caused significantly more trouble such as inserting malicious code into networks, locking users out of systems unless ransomware was paid, and so on. And this could still happen. Cisco acted quickly in response to this problem, but there may be other vulnerabilities still yet unfound or exposed. One hacker news site reported that, according to Internet scanning engine Shodan, more than 165,000 systems were still vulnerable days after the attack. Those who didn’t update security patches may still be.

What can you do now?

If you think your system may have been infected, there are a few steps you can take to check. But even if you’re safe, for now, you may be exposed to other vulnerabilities in the future in unexpected ways. Single Path can help you build up your defenses, protect your systems, and help you rebound if you face a malicious computer attack.

As this story demonstrates, patching is critical for all IT assets, including networking components. Single Path provides a wide range of services, from security offerings like Patching, Desktop Security Risk Assessment and Managed Firewall, Content Filtering & Proxy Services, to consulting services so we can analyze your needs and provide ongoing support and advice. Doing nothing is never a good idea; instead, play it safe and play it smart with Single Path.

Ask us how to get started!