Have I Been Hacked? 6 Ways to Tell If You’ve Been Hacked.

Many of us are constantly worrying: why did I click that link? Why did I go to that site? Why did I respond to that email? While there are many things we can do to keep ourselves and our organizations from being hacked, everyone makes a mistake every now and again. But being aware of the telltale signs you’ve been hacked can change the up-all-night question from, “Have I Been Hacked?” to “What Should I Do Now?” And asking that question can make all the difference.

  1. My Gadget is Too Slow!

Your computer is working fine, zipping along, and then … you wait. And wait. Your software gets sluggish, or constantly freezes or crashes. The commands you type take a few extra moments to respond, and your apps take forever to open. If you start noticing some of these symptoms, your gadget may be infected with viruses, trojans or worms. “Have I been hacked?” Quite possibly. Malicious software usually runs in the background, eating up your gadget’s resources while it’s active, often slowing down your system to a crawl.

  1. Why Am I Getting So Many Pop-up Ads?

Did you know malware can add bookmarks to your web browser, website shortcuts to your home screen, and modify the pop-up ads that you get while browsing? And when you click on that pop-up you could download another virus or be taken to a corrupt website selling bogus products or services to get your credit card information. “Have I been hacked?” If you start noticing browser pop-up ads from websites that don’t normally generate them, then the answer is probably, “yes.”

  1. I Got a Ransom Message!

Ransomware is malware that makes your data inaccessible unless you pay a ransom, often in online currency. “Have I been hacked?” If you get a ransomware demand, it could be fake, but there’s also a significant chance your data is gone unless you pay up. If you have a good, recent backup, you can simply recover the data without paying the ransom. If you haven’t backed up your data, you are at the mercy of the hackers holding your ransom. They might send you an encryption code to unlock your data if you pay the ransom. Then again, maybe they won’t.

  1. My Online Password Doesn’t Work!

You’ve typed your password five times. It’s the same password you always use. You’re getting annoyed it’s not working, and so you ask yourself, “Have I been hacked?” Someone might have logged in to your account and changed the password. But how? Per a current article by CSO online, this is most likely to happen after you’ve responded to a phishing email that looked legit, but wasn’t. You get an email you think is from a coworker or a vendor, and you share personal information, and next thing you know a site, with your credit card information conveniently stored, is in someone else’s hands. This is also why using the same passwords on multiple sites is a bad idea. Contacting one website to report fraudulent use is a challenge;  trying to remember all the dozens of sites with your password may be impossible.

  1. I Got An Antivirus Message!

This scam was a bit more prominent a few years ago, but it still comes up every now and again. Typically, you will get an antivirus warning after your computer has been infected. Get protection now! Your system may be compromised! Danger, Will Robinson! “Have I been hacked?” You bet. Clicking on the link takes you to a professional-looking website where they ask for your credit card number and billing information. The hacker now has control of your system and your credit card. It’s win-win for them (and lose-lose for you).

  1. “Where Did This Program Come From?”

Sometimes malicious programs are disguised as legitimate software. But if you don’t recognize the program it may be malicious. Unwanted software is sometimes installed at the same time you install another program; free programs you download from the web are often to blame. “Have I been hacked?” It’s a strong possibility. Always read your license agreements–some free programs actually admit they will be installing spyware or malware onto your computer to avoid legal action against them. They assume you’ll never read the agreement. Most people don’t.

“Have I Been Hacked?” If the Answer is Yes, Here’s What You Need to Do Now

If you have been hacked, you’re not alone. Research company Vanson Bourn found that 44% of organizations they surveyed had suffered multiple hacks in the last year, with an average loss of more than $1 million per company. Have I been hacked?” If so, you need to act quickly and:

  • Change all your passwords. Do this from another machine, as hackers can capture your keystrokes (commonly called keystroke logging). Don’t repeat any password on more than one page.
  • Use a password manager. Coming up with memorable and hard-to-uncover password for every site is nearly impossible. A password manager will create secure passwords and store them for you.
  • Enable two-factor authentication. If you’re not already doing this, use two-factor authentication for all your passwords. A hacker will need both your password and access to a physical device, like your phone, to access a site.
  • Report fraud. Always report fraud right away. Contact your bank and put a freeze on all your vulnerable credit cards immediately.
  • Update your antivirus software. While not 100% effective, these do work. Use a well-known provider. Some antivirus software is created by hackers, and the software will infect your machine, not protect it.
  • Check for new accounts. Open your Inbox, Spam, Trash, and Sent email folders to see if your email was used to set up new accounts—such as emails with subject lines that say, “Your account was successfully created.”
  • Reinstall your operating system and back up files. Reinstall your operating system, wipe your hard drive clean, and retrieve your backup files.

Or, call Single Path

Ideally, before you say,Have I been hacked?” you’ll take action to avoid that problem, such as calling Single Path. We can help restore your system after a hack, or even better, help prevent one from happening. Our Security Offerings give you a line of defense that leave hackers frustrated and seeking easier prey. And our Managed Cloud Services give you access to leading technology with the most recent security patches, without the need for ongoing investments. So, instead of asking “Have I been hacked?” you’ll be saying, “I’m glad I called Single Path.”

Ask us how to get started! 

7 Pain Points That Cloud Migration Can Solve

The use of the cloud for data storage, sharing and communication continues to grow for both businesses and schools. In fact, virtually all North American organizations (97 percent) use the cloud one way or another, and it’s predicted that 80% of small businesses will solely rely on cloud computing by 2020. For many organizations, this is a positive development due to the many advantages that cloud migration provides. If you’re late on switching to the cloud, or only doing so for a small portion of your business, consider these seven pain points addressed by migrating your data to the cloud.

  1. Hidden expenses

Nearly two-thirds of small businesses and organizations are expected to buy new IT equipment this year, but the costs go beyond the hardware. For example, some organizations have rooms solely dedicated to servers, which not only takes up needed floorspace, but can demand costly cooling and electric bills. The organization may also face potentially high maintenance and repair bills, and will need to keep a larger IT team on staff to maintain the equipment. In fact, it’s estimated that 80% of an organization’s IT costs aren’t spent purchasing computers, but on aftermarket tech and labor costs. With cloud migration, however, many of these costs go away.

  1. Data security

One of the biggest concerns of every organization is data security, especially with data breaches and other cybercrimes continuing to grow, both at schools and businesses. These breaches can be devastating to an organizations’ bottom line, and its reputation.

Cloud providers have stringent cloud security requirements they must adhere to, and offer many advanced features that can ensure data is securely stored and handled. For example, some cloud security features can wipe a device’s data, and its access to data, in case the device goes missing. (We wrote about data security and other cloud advantages in our previous blog post: 12 Reasons to Move Your Business to the Cloud.)

  1. Lack of accessibility and mobility

The days of working on-site, and only on-site, are long gone. In fact, globally, 70% of employees work remotely at least once a week. After migrating your data to the cloud, resources can be easily stored, retrieved and recovered with just a few clicks from anywhere. Not only is data available even if your team members are at home or travelling, many applications can be run on Internet browsers. This means employees, teachers or even students don’t need access to expensive computers to run many routine, mission-critical apps.

  1. Work-life balance

Since the cloud is always on, employees can collaborate from anywhere, at any time. Cloud migration provides workplace flexibility in both hours and location; employees can work from a doctor’s waiting room, for example, rather than being forced to take an entire half day off. More and more employees expect a great deal of flexibility in their work lives; the ability to offer that flexibility can mean the difference between hiring and keeping a key employee.

  1. Scalability

Different companies have different IT needs, and those needs change as companies expand or shrink. With cloud migration, businesses can add or remove resources easily without the cost and risk of investing in physical infrastructure. This level of agility can give businesses a real advantage over their competitors. Global Dot, a leading web and cloud performance reseller, says: “Scalability is probably the greatest advantage of the cloud.”

  1. The carbon footprint

A 2014 study by New York City revealed that, on average, each student, teacher and staff member in their school districts uses 28 pounds of paper a year. The costs can be surprisingly high­–a school with 100 teachers can spend $25,000 on paper a year alone according to Edutopia. That doesn’t include toner costs and energy use: maintaining equipment, including cooling that equipment, can be even more costly. With cloud storage, that money can go right back into the budget.

But the green benefits may be even greater. According the Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI), cloud computing can reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by 16.5%. While moving to the cloud is good for the environment, it may also prove to be good for business­–more than 66% of responders to a recent Nielsen study would be willing to pay more for products made by environmentally-responsible companies

  1. Disaster recovery

Data loss is a major concern for any organization. What happens to your data in the case of equipment failure, theft or even human error? Storing your data in the cloud guarantees that data is always available, and available anywhere. Cloud-based services also provide quick data recovery after emergencies such as natural disasters and power outages. Yet, despite the potential dangers and risks involved in the case of a disaster, 75% of small businesses have no disaster recovery plan in place according to IT service provider phoenixNAP.

Let’s Get Cloud Migration Started

Incorporating and committing to the cloud can save money, increase productivity and guard against disaster. But navigating your options, training staff on proper protocols, transferring data and more can take a lot of time and effort. That’s where Single Path comes in. Our Managed Cloud Services give you access to our seasoned expertise without high initial costs or ongoing investments in upgrades. We can provide lower costs, access to the latest technology, reduced risk, adaptability to changing business conditions and superior support. We work with many organizations, including businesses and schools, and are always eager to discuss your unique situation. Cloud migration can improve security, performance and communication. Ask us how to get started! 

The Importance of Email and IM Encryption for Cyber Security

IM encryptionThe average office worker receives about 90 emails a day, and sends 40 emails. Also, 97% of all Americans text at least once a day and 80% text for business purposes. Yet, while more and more team members are cautious about file sharing and data protection, many are still unaware how easily an email can be intercepted by a hacker, or how easily SMS texts can be monitored by outside parties. The solution is data encryption.

What is Encryption and how does it work?

Encryption is the process of encoding information to prevent anyone other than its intended recipient from reading it. Data encryption uses an algorithm (known as a cipher or ciphertext) to convert information into random characters or symbols. These are unreadable to anyone who does not have access to a special encryption key used to decrypt the information (we described this in more detail in the first of an earlier two-part blog post about data encryption).

Email Encryption

A single, intercepted email can provide a password, a confidential file or other private information to a hacker. But a hacker can also hijack your entire email account to read emails, send emails, gather confidential information and more. As reported in a recent PC World article, “If you leave the connection from your email provider to your computer or other device unencrypted while you check or send email messages, other users on your network can easily capture your email login credentials.” To keep your emails and email accounts safe, these three things should be encrypted:

  • The connection from your email provider. Encrypting the connection prevents unauthorized users from intercepting and capturing login credentials, and any email messages travelling server-to-server.
  • Your actual email message. Encrypting email messages means any emails intercepted will be unreadable.
  • Your stored, cached or archived email messages. Encrypting your stored messages will prevent a hacker from reading the saved files on your hard drive or network.

Instant Messaging Encryption

For many people on your team, the productivity advantages of Instant Messaging are enormous. The speed of delivery and response can far surpass other electronic communication options. But since standard SMS texting is unencrypted, conversations can be monitored by hackers or even law enforcement personnel.

Fortunately, many IM providers already implement a level of encryption. For example, the Messages app on an iPhone or macOS device incorporates end-to-end encryption. The WhatsApp messaging feature on many Android and Windows devices also uses end-to-end encryption

Other providers may not be as secure. Recently, popular collaboration hub Slack received some unwanted attention for just this reason. Slack markets itself as a place “where you and your team can work together to get things done … From project kickoffs to budget discussions, and to everything in between.” Slack has more than 10 million users every day. But according to a report by CNBC, executives are concerned about the commonplace sharing of sensitive data on Slack. “I love my people, but they never shut up on Slack,” said the CEO of a security company. “It’s very good for productivity, but the problem is we’re working on security, so we have to be careful about what we say.” About a quarter of corporate breaches are related to insiders, (per a report from Verizon) and they can easily use information gathered from collaboration tools like Slack and Dropbox.

Encryption Made Easy

Encryption applications for emails and SMS messaging are easy to find, but not all are equally effective or easy to use. In addition to security, a successful encryption program should be:

  • Encryption should take as few steps as possible, and be easily accomplished by the most non-technical user. For the most part, this means the email encryption application should be automatic.
  • Encryption should enable the safe delivery of messages to anyone, regardless of their email server or own security protocols (or lack of them). It should look and act just like regular email.
  • Content Agnostic. Your email encryption should also encrypt documents, sound files, spreadsheet, video or any other attachment.
  • Only you and your recipient(s) should be able to read the message, not even your encryption provider.

The Importance of Staff Training

With so many people in your organization dependent on email and IM, it is critically important that they are aware of the risks involved, and are open to incorporating best practices into their daily routines. Security Awareness Training should be a mandatory part of every team member’s basic training. Security Awareness Training conditions staff not to click or open anything that looks suspicious, and focuses on changing human behavior to make security part of workplace culture.

How To Implement Encryption For Your Cyber Security Program

If your organization is not currently encrypting instant messages, and insisting on the use of encrypted email applications, you are putting your organization at pointless risk. Single Path works with many different businesses and schools on their cyber security. We can train your staff, help you analyze, procure and implement the best security software and protocols, and work with you to put the processes in place to help you navigate safely through the dangerous online world. Our security offerings are as vast as they are effective. Safer and effective messaging through encryption is a great place to begin.

Ask us how to get started!

The Top 9 Cyber Security Myths and the Top 9 Cyber Security Truths

You might think your business is too small for a cyberattack, your security is too strong or your data is too insignificant. Unfortunately, we have some bad news: no organization is safe from the continually growing threat of a cyberattack regardless of size, industry or best efforts. Here are the top nine cyber security myths, and the harsh realities behind them.

  1. Cyber Security Myth: Only big organizations are at risk of a cyberattack.
    Reality: Half of all data breach victims are SMBs.

According to the 2018 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report, 58% of data breach victims are small businesses. That’s because SMBs are often seen as more vulnerable than bigger businesses and as having fewer security protocols in place. A recent study by the Poneman Institute, The 2018 State of Cyber Security in Small and Medium Size Businesses, revealed that 70% of small businesses have experienced a cyberattack in the last 12 months. According to the report, only 28% of small businesses rate their ability to mitigate threats, vulnerabilities and attacks as “highly effective.”

  1. Cyber Security Myth: Hackers aren’t interested in my industry.
    Reality: Any organization with sensitive information is vulnerable.

Malware and viruses don’t discriminate; any machine or network can pick up a Trojan Horse or face a ransomware scheme. While financial services and healthcare are among those industries hit by the most cyberattacks, wide nets are cast and can land anywhere. Across the world, ransomware attacks are up 350% and IoT attacks are up 600%. If your business has a network or a computer, it’s at risk.

  1. Cyber Security Myth: I’m only at risk from outside cyberthreats.
    Realty: Insider threats are frequent and often harder to detect.

From rogue employees to careless ones, from third-party contractors to business partners, research suggests insider threats account for up to 75% of all security breaches. According to a recent article from Security Magazine, 32% of companies can’t even determine the root source of a data breach after 12 months–so that 75% could be even higher.

  1. Cyber Security Myth: Cyber security is the IT department’s responsibility.
    Reality: Cyber security is the responsibility of every member of your team.

According to some reports, more than 90% of malware is installed over email. If your employees aren’t trained on cyber security best practices, such as how to identify phishing emails and the risk of clicking on unsafe links, they could be leaving your organization in peril. Some email hacking ploys are quite sophisticated, and employees are not always on guard. Regular cyber security awareness training is critical.

  1. Cyber Security Myth: You’ll know immediately if your network is infected.
    Reality: Modern malware is stealthy and hard to detect.

It takes an average of 191 days for a business to detect a data breach, and then another 66 days to fully contain it. The longer a breach occurs, the more files may be compromised, the more data can be stolen (and perhaps sold on the black market) and the more likely your organization is to suffer irreparable harm.

  1. Cyber Security Myth: My anti-virus and anti-malware software keeps me safe.
    Reality: Software can’t protect against everything.

In 2016, the cybersecurity company McAfee says it found four new strains of malware every second. Who knows how many they never detect? There is no way updates can keep up with the evolution of cyberthreats. Making matters worse, many businesses don’t immediately install security patches, either due to ignorance of difficulty. As reported by online security site CSO, “People aren’t too dumb or lazy to install patches. They want to do the right thing. But patching can be difficult for a multitude of reasons, and those roadblocks explain why patching is performed so poorly in most organizations.”

  1. Cyber Security Myth: My passwords are strong enough.
    Reality: You need two-factor authentication.

When multiple employees have access to the same system, that system is only as strong as the weakest password. But even a strong password isn’t without risk: an employee can be duped into sharing a password via a phishing scheme, or re-use a password that is compromised somewhere else. Two-factor authentication can reduce much of this risk.

  1. Cyber Security Myth: Our organization has never faced a cyberthreat, so we’re safe.
    Reality: That’s what everyone says right before they go out of business.

Are you familiar with the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) breach list? Every month this list is updated with newly reported business data breaches, most of which never make the front page. You won’t have to look long to find an organization like yours, whether it’s a business your size, in your industry, in your state, or all of those. This list also details how the breach occurred and what was affected. It can be eye opening for many small businesses, especially with 60% of small businesses folding within six months of a cyberattack.

  1. Cyber Security Myth: Complete cyber security is achievable.
    Reality: No, never. Which is why you need a partner like Single Path.

In 2017, a cyberattack cost small-to-medium sized businesses an average of $2,235,000 per attack. Keeping your business safe from cyberthreats is a critical job; it can also be a full-time one. That’s why you need a partner like Single Path. We have helped thousands of organizations like yours protect themselves. From employee training to managed cloud services, from hardware procurement to our full slate of security solutions, we can implement the protocols you need to have a safer, more cybersecure organization. Because the biggest cyber security myth of them all is that your organization is safe.

Ask us how to get started now.

Why DDoS Security is Critical for your School (and what is DDoS, anyway)?

If you regularly follow our blogs, you’ve read about the dangers of Phishing and Ransomware, but there’s a third method of cybercrime that can be just as damaging: a DDoS attack, or “Distributed Denial of Service.” A DDoS attack occurs when a hacker takes control of thousands of computers and aims traffic at a single server, overwhelming its network to knock it offline or slow it to a crawl. Without appropriate DDoS security protocols, an attack can cause mass and immediate disruption.

EdTech Magazine reports that DDoS attacks “are on the rise. For schools, the attacks can shut down websites, phone systems and prevent users from accessing the internet and applications.” Here are some recent examples of school-related DDoS security issues in recent years,:

  • The Miami-Dade County Public school system was unable to provide online testing for three days after a series of DDoS attacks crippled their new, high-touted computer-based standardized testing system.
  • Minnesota Department of Education twice had to suspend its state testing when a DDoS attack kept students from logging into its online assessment system.
  • The St. Charles, Illinois school district lost online access for employees and all of their 13,000 students. According to a report from eSchool News, “the hackers cut off the entire district’s internet access for four hours at a time and then repeated the process 10 more times over the following six weeks.” Eventually, two students were charged in the attack.
  • Rutgers, Arizona State and University of Georgia have all been victims of recent DDoS attacks. After an attack, Rutgers spent $3 million dollars and raised tuition 2.3% just to upgrade their DDoS security, and then became a DDoS victim again less than a year later.

The Simplicity of a DDoS Attack

Many schools, even those that are on the alert to cyberthreats, may not be paying much attention to their DDoS security. But it doesn’t take a cyber-genius to launch a DDoS attack. You can find relatively simple how-to videos on popular sites such as YouTube. The ease of launching such an attack, combined with inadequate DDoS security, makes this scheme popular with a wide variety of groups as a form of protest, as an act of “revenge,” as a distraction from another cyberattack, or even just for “fun.”

The lack of DDoS security can also harm schools through their vendors or partners. In September of last year, millions of families across 45 states were impacted by a DDoS attack on the app Infinite Campus, which provides a “Parent Portal” allowing parents and students the ability to check grades and other information.

How To Implement Your DDoS Security

Schools have become a target for cybercriminals, accounting for 13 percent of all data breeches in the first half of 2017, which involve nearly two billion student and parent records. But schools can incorporate numerous strategies to increase security, including their DDoS security, such as by switching to cloud networking, monitoring cyber-traffic for abnormal patterns, and adding backup internet service providers to keep networks up and running. School districts can also upgrade their firewall protection and their network architecture. Sounds like a lot of work? It can be.

That’s why Single Path partners with schools to help protect their IT technology from hackers, and to make upgrades and changes as easy and as turnkey as possible. We consult and implement, provide continual monitoring, and can also educate your staff on data security best practices. We also provide a wide variety of Managed/Cloud Services. DDoS security can be challenging, which is why you need a team like Single Path to help protect your organization from harm.

Ask us how to get started!

 

 

 

6 Ways to Improve Employee Cyber Security Awareness, for Businesses and Schools

According to Accenture’s Cost of Cyber Crime Study, the average cost of cyber crime in the United States reached $21.22 million per organization last year (compared to $17.26 million the year before). But you can’t depend solely on your IT department for your cyber security. After all, a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Improving cyber safety means increasing employee cyber security awareness throughout your entire business or school.

Here are the 6 top ways you can get your employees on board to increase engagement and improve employee cyber security awareness.

  1. Education

Do your employees or staff know:

  • Working remotely using an unsecure Wi-Fi connection leaves computers vulnerable to attacks?
  • Using personal, unsecured devices for work can open the door to compromising an organization’s network?
  • What employees say and do on social media can be tracked by cybercriminals and used against them in the workplace?

Chances are, some if not all of those points may surprise some people on your team. Most experts agree that the #1 key to cyber security compliance at a business or school is educating staff on the risks. For example, in addition to the above bullet points, does everyone on your team know how to spot a Phishing email (see our earlier blog post, How to Spot a Phishing Email), or the risks of using a thumb drive (see our post, USB Security Risks: When Flash Drives Become Dangerous)? An educated team, with increased employee cyber security awareness, makes for a more secure organization.

  1. Assign Mandatory Training

Recently we came across an article in Forbes Magazine that recommended, “Employees and management from all industries should be assigned mandatory cyber security compliance training every year.” This requirement can be administered with computer-based training modules and tied into annual reviews. When implementing training you’ll want to ensure executive and management support, a way to measure success, and also consider incentivizing participation (for more information, check out our earlier blog post, We’re Only Human: The Importance of Security Awareness Training.)

You may want to work with an outside partner to implement training, such as Single Path. We’re well versed in educating and training staff in the most up-to-date cyber security best practices.

  1. Establish and Promote Simple Procedures

More often than not, employees are happy to follow procedures as long as they are aware of them, and they are easy understand. Create organization-wide procedures for your team to follow. Make sure they are functional, actionable and simple.

Once you have those procedures in place, figure out the best way to communicate them within the organization. Keep communication friendly, and avoid hard-to-understand cyberspeak. Says Ashwin Ramasamy, co-founder of marketing intelligence company PipeCandy, “We use comic book-like imagery and sci-fi and comic language in posters across the office that reinforces the message without being suffocating.” Choose a method of communication that will resonate with your team.

  1. Encourage Reporting of Incidents

The best-trained employees can still fall for a hacking ploy from time to time, such as opening a file or clicking a link without thinking. Even IT professionals fall for these tricks. But if a user feels foolish for falling for an attack, and are embarrassed, he or she is less likely to report it. Create a reporting system that rewards staff for reporting suspicious messages, and that allows them to share mistakes without penalty or stigma.

  1. Have Employees Manage Initiatives

Rather than protocols created only by management, make cyber security policy an employee-managed initiative. Create a committee with representatives from every department, and make it their responsibility to set procedure, communicate policy and enforce compliance. Department participation, where everyone feels included, helps ensure individual buy-in.

  1. Make Awareness a Part of New-Employee Orientation

Employees expect to learn rules and processes when they start a new job, and making cyber security a part of their new-employee orientation stresses its importance, and immediately lays the groundwork for your expectations. An employee handbook is also a great place to publish protocols and procedures.

Your Employee Cyber Security Awareness Partner

To implement an employee cyber security awareness program it helps to have a proven partner. Single Path has helped countless businesses, schools and other organizations create a robust, living program that connects employees and staff to best practices. We can help you create a functional and effective cyber-threat strategy for your school or business. Single Path Security offerings are extensive, collaborative and modern.

Ask us how to get started!

Five Top Cyber Security Threats for 2019

Cyber security concerns have been around for as long as there has been cyber-anything. The first computer virus was found infecting computers in the early 1970’s and the first malware author was convicted in 1988. Those early infections were primitive compared to today’s hacking threats, which continue to grow more complex and sophisticated. While it’s vital to be prepared against any contingency, no matter how remote, we consider these to be the top cyber security threats for 2019.

Cryptojacking Rising

Ransomware has grown by 350% according to a report by Dimension Data, and accounts for 7% of all malware. It has been reported that ransomware costs American businesses north of 75 billion dollars a year, with most attacks never publicly disclosed. The biggest increase in ransomware is expected to take the form of Cryptojacking, also known as “Cryptomining malware.” We discussed the problem of Cryptojacking in a recent blog post, in which we described how hackers can hijack computer processing power to mine cryptocurrency. We expect these cyber security threats for 2019 to continue to grow.

Software Subversion Expanding

As Security magazine reports, “While exploitation of software flaws is a longstanding tactic used in cyber attacks, efforts to actively subvert software development processes are also increasing.” In other words, the software you download may be infected, giving hackers a back channel into an entire network. Malware has even been detected in open source software libraries. Another variant is this: hackers may offer software that is spelled slightly different than a popular application (such as adding an “s” or leaving out a letter), with the only other difference being the inclusion of malware. So be careful what you download, even if it’s from a seemingly trusted source.

Cybercriminals Uniting

One of the top cyber security threats for 2019 is due to the expanding resources available to cybercriminals. Historically, many cybercriminals have worked alone, or in small groups. That’s starting to change. The proliferation of hacker forums and chat groups have launched a robust black market where cybercriminals buy and exchange malware, botnets and other criminal resources. The availability of these rogue offerings means that even inexperienced, or less able, hackers can launch sophisticated attacks. These “malware-as-a-service” opportunities will only continue to grow, which will result in an increased number of cyberattacks, especially in regards to identity and credit card theft. If you think the threats are numerous now–and they are–an aggressive and nearly overwhelming wave of attacks may be on the horizon.

Synergistic Threats Increasing

GandCrab has been in the news frequently. Discovered in January, GandCrab is a ransomware Trojan horse, encrypting files on a computer and then demanding payment to decrypt them. Just recently, the group behind GandCrab has targeted users visiting adult websites, asking for money to keep silent about their potentially embarrassing visits. This, however, is just a ruse to mask their real intent. When a user clicks on the email link, he or she inadvertently installs the GandCrab ransomware onto his or her computer.

GandCrab has grown to be so large, they are actually soliciting cybercriminals to partner with them. As McAfee reported, “At the end of September, the GandCrab crew started a ‘crypt competition’ on a popular underground forum to find a new crypter service they could partner with.” This will let the GandCrab organization expand its criminal activities in new, unforeseen, ways.

In 2019, many experts, including Security magazine, predicts attackers will continue to combine tactics to create multi-faced, or synergistic, threats. To combat them, organizations will also need to synergize their defenses.

Social Media Misinformation Mounting

The proliferation of Russian-originated Facebook pages influencing the 2016 U.S. presidential elections has been well documented by news sources across the world. So it shouldn’t be a surprise that cybercriminals are eyeing social media as offering rich opportunities for criminal enterprise, with posts and pages displaying an impressive degree of professional-looking design for dishonest purposes. Botnet operators are able to test messaging just like a marketer, including the use of hashtags, to determine the success rates of their misinformation.

Social media platforms are aware of the potential abuse, and are focusing their resources on stopping it, but with so many users, and so much data available on sites, criminals will further focus their resources on these big-scale platforms.

Protect your business from the Cyber Security Threats for 2019

These five cyber security threats for 2019 are just the tip of the iceberg. There are many more threats out there, many of which we may not even be able to imagine yet. The only thing an organization can do is to be prepared with smart, sophisticated technological resources and by adhering to best Internet safety practices. Consider Single Path your partner in anti-crime. Single Path Security Offerings run the gamut from employee training to insider threat solutions. We’ll help you be prepared for the cyber security threats for 2019 and also those still to come.

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Six Steps to Creating an Effective Business Continuity Plan

You take all the recommended cybersecurity precautions. You back up. Your staff is trained on processes. You have firewalls in place, passwords that are hard to decipher, and the most recent security patches in place. Yet, you still worry. You’re not alone. According to a recent survey, businesses ranked cyberattacks as their #1 threat, with data breach a close second. But if you are victimized by a cybersecurity incident, what do you do now? If you have a business continuity plan in place, the answer to that question is easy: follow the business continuity plan.

A business continuity plan is not the same as a disaster recovery plan, although they have a lot of similarities. As CIO magazine explains, a BC plan is about “maintaining business functions or quickly resuming them in the event of a major disruption,” while DR “focuses mainly on restoring an IT infrastructure and operations after a crisis.” In other words, DR is specific to IT, while a business continuity plan is concerned with the continuity of the entire organization (we discussed the six things you needed to include in your disaster recovery plan in an earlier article).

When you create your business continuity plan, make sure you take into account these six criteria:

  1. Conduct a business impact analysis

As Ready.gov reports, your business continuity plan should start with a complete analysis of the consequences of a business disruption and can include:

  • Lost sales and income, or delayed sales or income
  • Increased expenses (e.g., overtime labor, outsourcing, expediting costs, etc.)
  • Regulatory fines
  • Contractual penalties or loss of contractual bonuses
  • Customer dissatisfaction or defection
  • Delay of new business plans

Your Business Impact Analysis should also detail various risk scenarios and prioritize the order of events for restoration.

  1. Get everyone involved

If you are making the assumption that IT security is solely the responsibility of the IT department, think again. Your entire organization should be working together to protect its data and systems. Consider holding a brief workshop on IT security, create a business continuity management committee with members within and outside the IT department, and consider the impact and recovery on each member of your staff.

One crucial area of involvement is with your leadership team. As reported by Disaster Recovery Journal, it’s important for executives to support a culture of collaboration and to be transparent. “If executives support a culture of transparency, people will be more willing to reveal and troubleshoot problem areas in your organization’s processes. Down the road, this could help the organization mitigate a major vulnerability.”

  1. Establish work-arounds

Ready.gov paints this scenario: “Telephones are ringing and customer service staff is busy talking with customers and keying orders into the computer system. The electronic order entry system checks available inventory, processes payments and routes orders to the distribution center for fulfillment. Suddenly the order entry system goes down. What should the customer service staff do now?”

Developing manual workarounds eliminates uncertainty. For example, listing contact personnel (along with phone numbers and contact information) and providing specific details, such as how to document transactions manually, gives your team direction. You may need to reassign staff or even bring in temporary assistance if systems fail. How will you do that? Plan it all out now in your business continuity plan.

  1. Keep data on the cloud

The best way to ensure your business can continue to run, is by backing up all your data on the cloud. A cloud service ensures that an organization’s critical data and processes are secure off-site. An organization can then quickly ramp up their systems in the case of a disaster. If you’re not already on the cloud, check out our earlier posts, 12 Reasons to Move Your Business to the Cloud and 9 Facts to Know About the Risks of Moving to the Cloud, and How to Manage Them.

  1. Ready crisis communication efforts

How prepared is your organization to quickly and effectively respond to and communicate with the public—and each other–during or after a cybersecurity incident? If you are hit by a breach, you may need to issue statements to the press, customers, partners, vendors and staff. We recently posted an article about emergency communication preparedness, in which we stressed the importance of drafting some templates that cover various scenarios. As we wrote: “it’s faster and easier to tweak a message than to write one from scratch for a multitude of mediums, and even multiple languages, if needed.”

  1. Test your business continuity plan

The time to ensure your business continuity plan is effective is before you need it. Is it comprehensive? Are there gaps? For example, are contact phone numbers correct? Are you able to restore data from the cloud without significant barriers or challenges? Since the network may be down, are there hard copies of the business continuity plan, and are they distributed to all the members of the team?

As suggested by CIO magazine, testing options for your business continuity plan include a table-top exercise in a conference room with the team looking for gaps, a structured walk-through or “fire-drill,” often with a specific disaster in mind, and disaster simulation testing in which an actual disaster is simulated involving all the equipment, supplies and personnel (including business partners and vendors) that would be needed.

  1. Call Single Path

While all the steps above are important there’s a seventh step that may be just as vital: call an outside partner like Single Path. As experts in cloud services, IT security solutions and more, Single Path works with businesses, schools and other organizations to protect them from cyberattacks and help them recover when they’re hit. Planning, monitoring and adhering best practices go a long way to protecting your customers or clients, team members, vendors and your own business. Calling a partner like Single Path, and getting your business continuity plan published, are important first steps.

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USB Security Risks: When Flash Drives Become Dangerous

Flash drive. Thumb drive. Jump drive. USB stick. Whatever you call it, most of us have at least one of these ubiquitous, simple devices. The very first USB drive—called the DiskOnKey—held a whopping 8MB of data. Today, they not only hold countless gigabytes, but they may also hold numerous USB security risks; so can charging ports, memory sticks and other common devices.

Beware the USB

Malware or a virus can be loaded into a flash drive, which can then automatically infect a machine when the user inserts the stick into it. Back in 2014 some security researchers showed how easy this was; and things haven’t changed much. Researchers have shown how malware from a USB stick can take control of a computer, upload files, track browser history, infect software and even provide a hacker remote keyboard control. In many cases the problems can’t be patched, infected files can’t be cleaned, and the infection almost impossible to detect.

Shared Data, Lost Data

Flash drives are convenient, but their size also makes them USB security risks. Recently, IBM banned workers from using them for work, along with any removable memory device. As reported by the BBC, IBM cited the possibility of “financial and reputational” damage if staff lost or misused the devices.

IBM is being cautious, and for good reason. A few months ago, the University of Toledo made news when a faculty member lost a flash drive filled with social security numbers (as reported by the Toledo Blade). In 2017, an insurance underwriter paid a $2.2 million HIPAA breach settlement after a USB drive containing sensitive health information of more than 2,200 people was stolen from its IT department.

Even deleting the information from a USB drive isn’t always effective for USB security, as the devices can leave traces of files behind, or even full copies, which an expert hacker can recover.

Charging Malware

Using a flash drive isn’t the only USB security risk. Many modern laptops can now be charged through the USB port, a tremendous convenience but one that can leave a machine open for attack. Much like thumb drives, these small USB chargers are borrowed and shared, and lost and replaced. Like USB chargers, they can also be booby trapped to inject malware, root kits and other malicious infections into a computer, allowing the hacker access to files and data.

Getting the Drop on USB Security

Not every trick is high tech, as shown in this simple ploy: a hacker drops an infected USB drive on the ground, which is then picked up and used, infecting a computer. According to an article by digital news company Mic, researchers dropped a few hundred USB devices around the University of Illinois, even going as far as attaching keys or a return mailing address to some of them. Incredibly, 48% of the 300 devices they dropped were picked up and plugged into a computer.

Laptop Leaving

USB devices aren’t the only portable devices that can put you at risk. Have you ever left a laptop on the table at a coffee shop while you stood in line, or ran to the restroom? Even if your laptop is where you left it when you return, that doesn’t mean it hasn’t been compromised.

A test of Google’s Chrome browser showed how easy and fast it is to steal passwords from an unguarded screen. One reporter for the Guardian says he tried exactly that: and stole 52 passwords in 57 seconds. If your computer doesn’t have a master password, it’s a simple procedure to access every web password you have.

USB Security and the GDPR

Recently, the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) was implemented for Europe, with a whole new set of rules regarding privacy protection and sharing of information. We reported on this in great detail in an earlier blog post. One interesting aspect of the GDPR is in regards to USB drive compliance. Keeping customer information safe and secure, with only limited employee access to this data, is at the heart of the GDPR. The failure to use an encrypted USB stick to transport data can be considered a breach of protocols and result in hefty fines.

Security Protocols

Instead of relying on antiquated USB devices to share files, most companies should switch to cloud computing, which allows for safe storage and accessibility of files across a secured network. We wrote a blog post recently in which we listed a number of practices small-to-medium sized businesses should implement immediately, including amping up their cyber security, going to the cloud, and finding the right tech partner to assist them in setting it all up.

As security experts, Single Path is that “right partner” for many organizations. We know a thing or two about USB security, and even more about network security and data security. We help our clients implement proactive infrastructure patch management, provide a security risk assessment and much more. We also offer a full slate of managed cloud services, giving you access to the best cloud technologies without high initial costs or ongoing investments in upgrades.

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5 Spooky Network Security Hacks That Can Haunt Your Office

What’s making that icy feeling of dread crawl up your spine? Is it from a Halloween ghost haunting your supply closet? Or the fear that your fax machine has been taken over by evil spirits? Assuming those evil fax spirits are hackers trying to crash your network security, that last guess might not be so far-fetched.

The Threat of IoT to Network Security

With the influx of Internet devices, many of which we wear or use daily, the security issues related to the Internet of Things are growing. Garner analysts predict that more than 25% of all cyberattacks will involve IoT devices by 2020. We detailed IoT in a previous blog post, where we discussed how hackers can infiltrate network security through your HVAC system, Smart Watch and more. Here are five more spookily surprising devices that can be hacked and compromise network security.

  1. Your Fax is Lax

The problem with many electronic devices is that their manufacturers just aren’t paying very close attention to security. Even if you have a newer fax machine or printer, it may still use security protocols established in the 1980’s. More than 45 million fax machines are in operation worldwide, many as part of all-in-one printers. Healthcare organizations in particular use fax machines for the vast majority of their communication.

According to an article from Healthcare IT News, a hacker would only need a fax number to launch a malicious attack. The attacker could then transmit an image with an embedded code that would allow them to take over the fax machine. That might not sound horrible, until you realize “They would then be able to download and deploy other tools to scan the network and compromise devices.” In other words, the Fax machine becomes the portal into a network, and its data.

  1. A Call For Help

Employees use their mobile phones almost as often as their computers, if not more so. It’s easy to forget that these devices often have complete network access and can be used to compromise network security, too. We’ve warned about this before; an earlier blog post on BYO devices for businesses, and another one about BYO devices in schools explain the need to establish an organization-wide BYOD policy, creating cloud back-ups of data and the importance of antivirus and malware protection.

But hackers can also use a non-mobile phone system to access a network. According to workplace technology company Ricoh, hackers can get past some phone system security protocols with little effort, and then can:

  • Eavesdrop on conversations
  • Tap into your VoIP line to make high-volume spam calls to foreign countries
  • Flood your server with data, using up bandwidth and causing your connections to be shut off. This may be followed with a ransomware demand.
  • Infect your system with viruses and malware. Just like office computers, your internet phones are vulnerable to programs that can track keystrokes, steal passwords and destroy information.
  1. Hackers are Eyeing Your Surveillance Cameras

Ironically, the security cameras designed to protect your business, could end up hurting it. And that’s spooky. While it’s convenient to watch security footage off-site, anything you can watch at home, hackers can watch too. Hackers can also take over the cameras to record videos or do their own surveillance of your workspace, sell camera access to other parties interested in doing that, make systems unusable or threaten to sell their use unless a ransom is paid, or even use the cameras to furtively steal credit card numbers from customers. Internet security company Trend Micro reports that one web forum claims, “as many as 2,000 exposed IP cameras are said to be connected to cafes, hospitals, offices, warehouses and other locations.”

  1. Getting a Smart TV may not be so Smart

A haunted television for Halloween?  Sort of. A recent Consumer Reports article (February 7, 2018) details how millions of smart TV’s have security flaws that can be easily hacked. A hacker can change channels, play offensive content or crank up (or down) the volume. While they probably can’t steal anything too valuable, this still can be “deeply unsettling to someone who didn’t understand what was happening.”

  1. A Coffee Jolt

The threat of someone hacking your coffee maker seems very, should we say, eye-opening? A recent article in the online journalistic mag The Conversation discussed how hackers can infiltrate cars, toys, thermostats, medical implants and yes, coffee machines. “A hacker who succeeds in communicating with one of these device can then conduct any number of possible attacks. They could disrupt communications, which would be irritating in the case of a coffee machine, but potentially life threatening in the case of a medical implant.”

Your Partner Against Crime

These hacking examples are just the tip of the iceberg (or perhaps the ice-cold fingertips of a Halloween skeleton). At Single Path, we’re security experts and our Security Offerings cover a vast menu of services. We can perform a desktop security risk assessment, implement a proactive network security plan and ethical hacking/employee training, implement next generation firewalls and establish email/content filtering. The threat of hacking doesn’t have to be Halloween-level frightening—at least not if you call Single Path.

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