What You Need To Know About Windows 7 End of Life

If your organization uses Windows 7 you are probably already aware Microsoft plans to discontinue this popular operating system beginning January 14, 2020. Windows has taken every opportunity to remind you of the Windows 7 End of Life event. After January 14, Microsoft will no longer offer technical assistance or software updates for Windows 7, including updates that help protect PCs from new cyber threats. If you’re a Windows 7 user, what does this mean for you, and what do you need to do before January 14?

Why is Windows 7 End of Life Happening?

Microsoft says they need to end Windows 7 support so they can focus on newer technologies. Windows 7 is 10 years old after all, which is about 200 years old in tech-years. But Windows 7 also remains incredibly popular, with recent reports showing that Windows 7 is still being used on more than 37% of all PCs.

Microsoft actually started the Windows 7 End of Life process by ending mainstream support on January 13, 2015. At that point they stopped adding new features and honoring warranty claims. However, they have still provided regular patches and updates to ensure security issues and bugs are fixed. That will no longer happen after January 14. The termination of support for Windows 7 comes just after Microsoft introduced Windows 10, and Microsoft wants you to upgrade to the new system, boasting that their Windows 10 software is the most secure Windows ever. But should you?

What’s the Big Deal? I think I’ll Keep Windows 7.

While your Windows 7 operating system will still work after January 14, the lack of security patches is a real concern. As PC Place points out, “The biggest issue with continuing to use Windows 7 is that it won’t be patched for any new viruses or security problems once it enters End of Life, and this leaves you extremely vulnerable to any emerging threats. What’s more, if a large number of people continue to use Windows 7 after the End of Life date, that could actually be a big incentive for malicious users to target viruses and other nasties at Windows 7.”

That Sounds Bad. What Are My Options? 

  1. Upgrade to Windows 10

Upgrading from Windows 7 to Windows 10 is by far be the easiest transition for your organization in response to Windows 7 End of Life. As TechRadar reports, “because both operating systems are made by Microsoft the upgrade process is relatively easy, and in many cases you can keep your files on your PC. This means you’ll experience the minimum of disruption when upgrading to Windows 10.”

And most reviews of Windows 10 have been positive, with the new system offering a number of new features including facial recognition, faster start-ups, “ink-accelerated technology” with a stylus, and new editing tools for photos and videos.

One of the biggest problems, however, is the possible expense involved—and purchasing the new operating system is only a fraction of that cost. You see, you might also have to buy everyone a new computer. As Microsoft says: “The best way for you to stay secure is on Windows 10. And the best way to experience Windows 10 is on a new PC. While it is possible to install Windows 10 on your older device, it is not recommended.”

Here are the minimum hardware specifications for Windows 10:

  • Processor:1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster processor or SoC
  • RAM: 1 gigabyte (GB) for 32-bit or 2 GB for 64-bit
  • Hard disk space: 16 GB for 32-bit OS 20 GB for 64-bit OS
  • Graphics card:DirectX 9 or later with WDDM 1.0 driver
  • Display:800 x 600 resolution

If all of your organization’s computers have those specifications, you’re set for your Windows 7 End of Life software purchase and transition. If not, however, you need to upgrade your hardware before you switch. And while prices continue to go down on many computer models, this can still be a sizable investment.

  1. Upgrade to a different operating system

Windows may be the most popular PC operating system, but it’s not the only one. For example, Linux has been around since 1991, and is a completely open source system (meaning it is free). Apple is also an option, although that will also necessitate brand new hardware, and many of your programs might not be compatible with their operating system.

Still, you might want to look into other options, especially if the expense of converting to Windows 10 is out of your budget.

  1. Upgrade to Windows 10, Slowly

While there are some advantages to simply pulling the Windows 7 End of Life band-aid quickly, it’s also possible to dip just one foot into the water. If you simply can’t make the switch before January 14, Microsoft is offering Windows 7 Extended Security Updates. These will continue to deliver updates and patches for Windows 7 business users after January 2020. However, these extended security updates aren’t free, and Microsoft is charging a per device fee. Current pricing is $25 a device for the first year of updates, $50 per device for year two, and $100 a device for year three, with no guarantee updates will be offered beyond that date. However, this approach may allow you the flexibility of updating or purchasing new computers in phases, and reducing a single year financial hit.

I’m Not Sure What To Do!

That’s what Single Path is here for. Choosing new technology applications for your school or business can be a difficult decision, especially when resources are limited. We are continuously meeting with companies, schools and other organizations to provide guidance on their Windows 7 End of Life choices, and help them make smart decisions, evaluate their current tools, and to continuously re-evaluate them. And our large menu of security solutions can help protect you from cyber threats, or rebound if you are hit by one. With considerable experience working with small-to-medium sized businesses, plus schools and school districts, we can help you operate with confidence.

Contact us for more information!