5 Spooky Network Security Hacks That Can Haunt Your Office

What’s making that icy feeling of dread crawl up your spine? Is it from a Halloween ghost haunting your supply closet? Or the fear that your fax machine has been taken over by evil spirits? Assuming those evil fax spirits are hackers trying to crash your network security, that last guess might not be so far-fetched.

The Threat of IoT to Network Security

With the influx of Internet devices, many of which we wear or use daily, the security issues related to the Internet of Things are growing. Garner analysts predict that more than 25% of all cyberattacks will involve IoT devices by 2020. We detailed IoT in a previous blog post, where we discussed how hackers can infiltrate network security through your HVAC system, Smart Watch and more. Here are five more spookily surprising devices that can be hacked and compromise network security.

  1. Your Fax is Lax

The problem with many electronic devices is that their manufacturers just aren’t paying very close attention to security. Even if you have a newer fax machine or printer, it may still use security protocols established in the 1980’s. More than 45 million fax machines are in operation worldwide, many as part of all-in-one printers. Healthcare organizations in particular use fax machines for the vast majority of their communication.

According to an article from Healthcare IT News, a hacker would only need a fax number to launch a malicious attack. The attacker could then transmit an image with an embedded code that would allow them to take over the fax machine. That might not sound horrible, until you realize “They would then be able to download and deploy other tools to scan the network and compromise devices.” In other words, the Fax machine becomes the portal into a network, and its data.

  1. A Call For Help

Employees use their mobile phones almost as often as their computers, if not more so. It’s easy to forget that these devices often have complete network access and can be used to compromise network security, too. We’ve warned about this before; an earlier blog post on BYO devices for businesses, and another one about BYO devices in schools explain the need to establish an organization-wide BYOD policy, creating cloud back-ups of data and the importance of antivirus and malware protection.

But hackers can also use a non-mobile phone system to access a network. According to workplace technology company Ricoh, hackers can get past some phone system security protocols with little effort, and then can:

  • Eavesdrop on conversations
  • Tap into your VoIP line to make high-volume spam calls to foreign countries
  • Flood your server with data, using up bandwidth and causing your connections to be shut off. This may be followed with a ransomware demand.
  • Infect your system with viruses and malware. Just like office computers, your internet phones are vulnerable to programs that can track keystrokes, steal passwords and destroy information.
  1. Hackers are Eyeing Your Surveillance Cameras

Ironically, the security cameras designed to protect your business, could end up hurting it. And that’s spooky. While it’s convenient to watch security footage off-site, anything you can watch at home, hackers can watch too. Hackers can also take over the cameras to record videos or do their own surveillance of your workspace, sell camera access to other parties interested in doing that, make systems unusable or threaten to sell their use unless a ransom is paid, or even use the cameras to furtively steal credit card numbers from customers. Internet security company Trend Micro reports that one web forum claims, “as many as 2,000 exposed IP cameras are said to be connected to cafes, hospitals, offices, warehouses and other locations.”

  1. Getting a Smart TV may not be so Smart

A haunted television for Halloween?  Sort of. A recent Consumer Reports article (February 7, 2018) details how millions of smart TV’s have security flaws that can be easily hacked. A hacker can change channels, play offensive content or crank up (or down) the volume. While they probably can’t steal anything too valuable, this still can be “deeply unsettling to someone who didn’t understand what was happening.”

  1. A Coffee Jolt

The threat of someone hacking your coffee maker seems very, should we say, eye-opening? A recent article in the online journalistic mag The Conversation discussed how hackers can infiltrate cars, toys, thermostats, medical implants and yes, coffee machines. “A hacker who succeeds in communicating with one of these device can then conduct any number of possible attacks. They could disrupt communications, which would be irritating in the case of a coffee machine, but potentially life threatening in the case of a medical implant.”

Your Partner Against Crime

These hacking examples are just the tip of the iceberg (or perhaps the ice-cold fingertips of a Halloween skeleton). At Single Path, we’re security experts and our Security Offerings cover a vast menu of services. We can perform a desktop security risk assessment, implement a proactive network security plan and ethical hacking/employee training, implement next generation firewalls and establish email/content filtering. The threat of hacking doesn’t have to be Halloween-level frightening—at least not if you call Single Path.

Ask us how to get started!

Find out what else is happening at Single Path. News ›